The lingity behind Creating C’s

– Creating C’s –

Cache: A area of storage space on a computer that temporarily stores webpages that a user has visited on a computer.

Cache and Cookie Washer: A program that clean browser tracks, including cache, cookies, history, mail trash, drop-down address bar, auto-complete forms and downloaded program files. It completely wipes out data for total privacy protection.

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS): A stylesheet language that describes the presentation of a document written in a markup language. CSS enables moving the text for ranking a page to the top of the HTML file, which is the reason for using CSS from an SEO perspective.

Charge Back: An incomplete sales transaction (for example: merchandise is purchased and then returned) that results in an affiliate commission deduction.

Click & Bye: The process in which an affiliate loses a visitor to a merchant’s site once they click on a merchant’s banner or text link.

Click Bot: A program generally used to artificially click on paid listings within the engines in order to artificially inflate click amounts.

Click Fraud: The deceitful practice of posing as pay-per-click traffic for the purpose of generating false revenue by the affiliates serving the ads. In PPC advertising terms, it generates a charge per click without having actual interest in the target of the ad’s link.

Click Through (also Click): When a user clicks on a link or advertisement and is taken to the destination of that link.

Click Through Rate (CTR): The number of clicks an ad receives, divided by the total number of times that ad is displayed or served (represented as: total clicks / total impressions = CTR). For example, if an ad has 100 impressions and 3 clicks, the CTR is 3 percent.

Client: A software program that is used to contact and obtain data from a server software program on another computer. Each client program is designed to work with one or more specific kinds of server programs and each server requires a specific kind of client.

Cloaking: A deceptive process that sends search engine spiders to alternative pages that are not seen by the end user. Search engines record content for a URL that is different from what the visitor sees in order to obtain more favorable search positions.

Cobranding: A website or page to which affiliates send visitors that includes their own logo and branding.

Collaborative Commerce Networks: An organization of merchants and websites that work together as business partners. Merchants give their affiliates the same support that manufacturers give to their resellers.

Commercide: When an ecommerce site has performance or transaction problems such as slow-loading pages or malfunctioning shopping carts. Users abandon the site and never come back.

Commission (Also Referral Fee, Finder’s Fee, Bounty): The income an affiliate receives for generating a sale, lead or click through to a merchant’s website.

Commission Rate: The rate of income an affiliate receives for generating a sale, lead or click through to a merchant’s website.

Compensation Rate: The rate at which an affiliate receives money in exchange for goods or services. It is how affiliates are paid and should be stated in the affiliate contract.

Content Management System: A document centric collaborative application for managing documents and other content. A CMS is often a Web application and often it is used as a method of managing websites and Web content.

Context Centric: Refers to a product or service offer that is placed next to relevant content on an affiliate’s site or that is closely matched to the interests of those who visit the website.

Contextual Advertising: The term applied to ads appearing on websites or other media where the ads are selected and served by automated systems based on the content displayed by the user.

Contextual Link: The integration of affiliate links with related text.

Contextual Merchandising: The act of placing targeted products near relevant content.

Contextual Search: A search that analyzes the page being viewed by a user and gives a list of related search results.

Convert (or Converting): A visitor who takes a desired action such as a sale or registration.

Conversion Rate: The number of visitors who convert after clicking through on an ad, divided by the total number of click throughs to a site for that ad. (Expressed as: total click throughs that convert / total click throughs for that ad = conversion rate.)

Conversion Reporting: A measurement for tracking conversions and lead generation from search engines queries. It identifies the originating search engine, keywords, specific landing pages entered and the related conversion for each.

Cookie: Small file stored on a visitor’s computer that records information. For affiliate programs, cookies have two functions: to keep track of what a customer purchases and to track which affiliate was responsible for generating the sale and is owed a commission.

Copyright: The right granted by law to the author or originator of certain literary, artistic and musical productions that allows the author, or those to whom the author grants a license, to control the use of the product for a period of time.

Cost Per Acquisition (CPA): The cost metric for each time a qualifying action, such as sales and registrations, takes place.

Cost Per Action (CPA): The cost metric for each time a commissionable action takes place.

Cost Per Click (CPC): The cost metric for each click to an advertising link.

Cost Per Lead (CPL): The cost an advertiser pays per qualified lead.

Cost Per Order (CPO): The cost metric for each time an order is transacted.

Cost Per Sale (CPS): The term for advertising in which the advertiser pays only for those clicks where the user clicks through on the banner or ad and actually purchases a product on the advertiser’s site.

Cost Per Thousand (CPM): The cost metric for one thousand banner advertising impressions. The amount paid per impression is calculated by dividing the CPM by 1,000. For example, a $10 CPM equals $.01 per impression.

Coupon: A popular form of online sales promotion. The consumer is usually offered an amount or percentage off of the next purchase upon presentation of the coupon.

Coupon Affiliate: An affiliate whose business model substantially consists of making coupons available.

Crawler (also Spider, Robot or Bot): Component of a search engine that gathers listings by automatically trolling the Web and following links to webpages. It makes copies of the webpages found and stores them in the search engine’s index.

Cross Promotion: A way to attract more customers with less by joining forces with people who reach the same target market. Cross promotions can include bundled offerings, collaboratively produced resources, co-branding offers, coop advertising and shared space.

Custom Feed: Enables submission to XML feeds for each of the shopping engines. The engines have different product categories and feed requirements.

Customer Acquisition Cost: The cost associated with acquiring a new customer via the Web or any other medium.

Customer Bounty: The merchant payment to an affiliate partner for every new customer that they direct to a merchant.

Cybersquatting: When a person buys a domain that is the trademark or near trademark of some other company.

Thanks Performance Marketing Association!

Cybersquatting is a real word? Sounds like some sort of felony – but apparently it’s legal. Where is the world coming to? 
– LReg

SEO vs PPC

Hey Lead Love Crowd! I came across a great article in the Entrepreneur Mag. about SEO vs PPC.

AJ Kumar talks about 3 main points:

AJ says 1. How large is your website advertising budget?

I would ditto this is a big piece of the pie. If you don’t know how much you can spend, it may restrict you on how much traffic you can generate for your website. What I think is more important is what your goals are as a company. If you don’t know what you want to achieve with your campaign – whatever kind it is, PPC, SEO, SEM, CPA, CPM, etc. – then it is really difficult to really use those dollars you do have in an effective way.

AJ says • Faster testing. Websites should focus on achieving conversion, whether it’s selling products, signing up email newsletter subscribers or some other action. That means actively testing website variables to improve conversion rates.

Definitely need to learn the best way you can optimize your campaigns to improve conversion rates. This can come by using a great tracking technology and experts who can help you find ways to improve. Integrate.com can be a great technology to take advantage of. They have all other sorts of perks too.

AJ says • Protection from SEO algorithm updates. One major weakness of SEO is that algorithms change from time to time.

So true, I came across a website lately, awesomize.me, and when talking to the CEO – they found a way to optimize their results to show up even before Facebook and Linkedin. They must have figured out something different.

AJ says 2. How high are the average CPCs in your industry?

I would echo this point as well. If you are looking for publishers to run you banner CPC offers and are not competitive in your pricing, you may not get the cream of the crop – if you catch what I am throwing at you. The better you pay, the better traffic you get – not always, but usually.

AJ says 3. How competitive are the SERPs in your niche? You also will want to determine how competitive the search engine results pages (SERPs) are for your target keywords. To do this, enter your keywords into the Google External Keyword Research Tool, which will tell you the estimated competition level, as well as the number of advertisers bidding on your keywords and the average CPCs.

SERPS is a new term for me, but keywords is not. I have to thank AJ for this tip – I will be checking into it further. I know in the past, I have entered keywords into the basic search in Bing, Google, Yahoo, other search engines… and taken notice of similar search terms. Maybe this is the old fashioned way of doing this – but it is interesting to learn of what people do ‘Google.’

Aj saysWhen combined, PPC and SEO can be quite powerful. Ask yourself these three questions and determine the optimal mix of PPC and SEO for your website.

Totally – and I would say don’t restrict yourself to only PPC and SEO, as there are many other performance marketing campaigns that can prove to be super effective for your business. Again no one size fits all – but the more you can expose yourself and the smarter you can spend – the better brand awareness and conversions you should see.